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Have You Noticed What You Notice?

It is said if we are lucky enough to see an iceberg, we only see the top 10%. The other 90% is under the surface. Stress is an inevitable part of life. It can come from a variety of sources, including work, family, relationships, and health concerns. The stress model suggests that at any given time, we are only aware of 10% of what's going on around us. This may seem like a small percentage, but it has a significant impact on how we experience and cope with stress.

The stress model is based on the idea that we are bombarded with a constant stream of stimuli from our environment. However, our brains are limited in their ability to process all of this information at once. As a result, we filter out a significant amount of information, and we only become aware of a small fraction of what's happening around us.

This filtering process is necessary for our survival, as it allows us to focus on what's most important in our environment. However, it also means that we miss out on a lot of information that could be helpful in understanding our experiences and coping with stress.

The stress model suggests that our awareness of our environment is influenced by three factors: sensory input, perceptual filters, and cognitive appraisal. Sensory input refers to the information that comes into our brains through our senses. Perceptual filters are the unconscious processes that help us select which sensory inputs to pay attention to. Cognitive appraisal is our conscious evaluation of the sensory inputs that we become aware of.

According to the stress model, our perceptual filters are influenced by a variety of factors, including our past experiences, our beliefs, and our expectations. These filters determine which sensory inputs we pay attention to and which ones we ignore. As a result, we only become aware of a small portion of what's happening around us.

Our cognitive appraisals also play a role in our awareness of our environment. When we experience stress, we evaluate the situation based on our beliefs, expectations, and past experiences. This evaluation determines how we perceive the stressor and how we respond to it.

The stress model suggests that our limited awareness of our environment can lead to increased stress levels. When we are only aware of a small portion of what's happening around us, we may miss important information that could help us understand and cope with our stressors. This can lead to feelings of overwhelm and helplessness.

However, by becoming more aware of our perceptual filters and cognitive appraisals, we can increase our awareness of our environment and reduce our stress levels. By paying attention to the sensory inputs that we tend to filter out, we can gain a better understanding of our experiences and develop more effective coping strategies.

In conclusion, the stress model suggests that at any given time, we are only aware of 10% of what's going on around us. This limited awareness can have a significant impact on how we experience and cope with stress. However, by becoming more aware of our perceptual filters and cognitive appraisals, we can increase our awareness of our environment and develop more effective coping strategies.


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